Interviews

Reviews

NYCB dancers in George Balanchine’s “Serenade.” Photograph Paul Kolnik

Abstraction & Americana

“NYCB Classics II” program which the company performed during its spring season at David H. Koch Theater included four dances: George Balanchine’s “Serenade,” “Duo Concertant,” and “Western Symphony” as well as Peter Martins’ “Hallelujah Junction.”
Ashley Ellis and Dusty Button of Boston Ballet in Karole Armitage's Bitches Brew; photo by Gene Schiavone

Mirrors

“Mirrors” opened with a work previously set on Boston Ballet's company. “Resonance”—choreographed by José Martinez and recently revived through the support of the Krupp Endowment for Contemporary Dance—is a moving work in which audience members can continue to find additional layers of depth upon second viewing.

New York

NYCB dancers in George Balanchine’s “Serenade.” Photograph Paul Kolnik

Abstraction & Americana

“NYCB Classics II” program which the company performed during its spring season at David H. Koch Theater included four dances: George Balanchine’s “Serenade,” “Duo Concertant,” and “Western Symphony” as well as Peter Martins’ “Hallelujah Junction.”

Los Angeles

Lil Buck. Photograph by Kyle Cordova

Footloose

He became a celebrity in 2011, when a video of him and superstar cellist Yo-Yo Ma went viral on YouTube (that it was shot by Spike Jonze also didn’t hurt). He is Charles (Lil Buck) Riley, purveyor of Memphis jookin—a sneaker-clad, footwork-centric idiom that evolved from hip-hop.

London

Rambert in “Tomorrow” by Lucy Guerin. Photograph by Johan Persson

Murder, Mystery & A Party

This year sees the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, a cause for many in the arts to celebrate the great bard’s life and works, and the latest triple bill from Rambert, “Murder, Mystery and a Party,” marks the occasion with its own contribution.

Toronto

Melbourne

Scotland

Darren Brownlie and James Bryce in Company Chordelia's “Nijinsky's Last Jump.” Photograph by Susan Hay

Leaps and Lost Waltzes

Vaslav Nijinsky's personal struggle with both genius and mental illness is a classic dramatic paradigm, cliché for a reason, but Company Chordelia's study of his life is both delicate and physical, avoiding the usual traps of dance biographies.